Thyme

Thymus vulgaris

 

 

Herbal Folklore & Tradition

One of the earliest medicinal plants employed throughout the Mediterranean region, well known to both Hippocrates and Dioscorides. It was used by the ancient Egyptians in the embalming process, and by the ancient Greeks to fumigate against infectious illness; the name derives from the Greek thymos meaning ‘to perfume’. It is also a long-established culinary herb, especially used for the preservation of meat. It has a wide range of uses, though in Western herbal medicine its main areas of application are respiratory problems, digestive complaints and the prevention and treatment of infection.

SKIN CARE:

Abscess, acne, bruises, burns, cuts, dermatitis, eczema, insect bites, lice, gum infections, oily skin, scabies.

CIRCULATION, MUSCLES AND JOINTS:

Arthritis, cellulitis, gout, muscular aches and pains, obesity, edema, poor circulation, rheumatism, sprains, sports injuries.

RESPIRATORY SYSTEM:

Asthma, bronchitis, catarrh, coughs, laryngitis, sinusitis, sore throat, tonsillitis.

DIGESTIVE SYSTEM:

Diarrhea, dyspepsia, flatulence.

GENITO-URINARY SYSTEM:

Cystitis, urethritis.

IMMUNE SYSTEM:

Chills, colds, flu, infectious diseases.

NERVOUS SYSTEM:

Headaches, insomnia, nervous debility and stress-related complaints.

thyme